Boxoffice is arguably more straightforward to report than TV ratings. You have this weekly Top 10 list of returns, you compare each movie to the other movies. TV ratings are a murky swamp where one network’s hit is another network’s flop and context is not just a factor, but often the entire story.

Han fucking soloYet one respect in which boxoffice reporting is pretty odd — emphasizing ticket grosses yet rarely mentioning ticket sales. That would be like always reporting how many ad dollars sold off „Lost“ and not mentioning the number of viewers  that actually watched the show. With everybody reporting how „Avatar“ is The Biggest Movie of All Time based on grosses ($1.859 billion and counting), it’s important to remember how rising ticket prices skew the returns.

Here’s the Top 20 movies of all time … by number of tickets sold:

1 „Gone With the Wind“ (1939) 202,044,600
2 „Star Wars“ (1977) 178,119,600
3 „The Sound of Music“ (1965) 142,415,400
4 „E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial“ (1982) 141,854,300
5 „The Ten Commandments“ (1956) 131,000,000
6 „Titanic“ (1997) 128,345,900
7 „Jaws“ (1975) 128,078,800
8 „Doctor Zhivago“ (1965) 124,135,500
9 „The Exorcist“ (1973) 110,568,700
10 „Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs“ (1937) 109,000,000
11 „101 Dalmatians“ (1961) 99,917,300
12 „The Empire Strikes Back“ (1980) 98,180,600
13 „Ben-Hur“ (1959) 98,000,000
14 „Return of the Jedi“ (1983) 94,059,400
15 „The Sting“ (1973) 89,142,900
16 „Raiders of the Lost Ark“ (1981) 88,141,900
17 „Jurassic Park“ (1993) 86,205,800
18 „The Graduate“ (1967) 85,571,400
19 „Star Wars: Episode I“ (1999) 84,825,800
20 „Fantasia“ (1941) 83,043,500

„Avatar,“ despite topping the worldwide gross list, by and by, is only No. 26 on the ticket sales list with 76,421,000 sold … at least, so far…

For more film blogging and breaking news, check out Borys Kit’s Heat Vision blog…

Posted via web from urban-listening’s webbuzz

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